February 9, 2017 12:40 pm

An historic perspective on the immigration ban

The response to the immigration ban imposed by President Donald Trump, many have found echoes of other historic eras.  ACLU of Illinois volunteer Rebecca Lipton recently shared with us her family’s experience. We are proud to share it with you. 

Burning_synagogue_on_Kristallnacht

Burning synagogue in Germany, 1938

I am so distressed at the outrageous denial of entry to lawful immigrants and desperate refugees enacted by Trump’s administration this week.  It is degrading and against our most sacred American values: our ethics and our people.

In the 1930s a political group calling itself America First opposed the admission of German refugees based on the fear that Nazi spies might sneak in among them. [Sound familiar?]  Of course, in those days anti-Jewish discrimination was also much more widespread. My Mom, aunt and grandparents were somehow able to escape from Germany in 1938, but were unable to find a safe haven until 1940, when they were allowed to come to Indianapolis. All the relatives who stayed behind in Europe were murdered.  My grandparents got jobs and raised their family. When she turned 18 my Mom became a U.S. citizen and had her picture featured in the Indianapolis Star – as a child I remember her showing it proudly to me.

In my mind, the only true patriots are those who raise their voices loudly against this disgraceful Muslim ban.  Remaining silent in the face of it is the same a spitting on the Stars and Stripes. Trump and his administration should be ashamed of themselves, and Republicans everywhere should be ashamed for them.  I certainly am.

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